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Exhibition

SPECTRE

Thursday
16
Jun 2022
Sunday
07
Aug 2022
  • Museum
12:00 > 18:00
EXPO : TARIF NORMAL 6.5
EXPO : TARIF REDUIT: Etudiant/Senior/Enseignant/Groupe/JAP/-26ans/botacarte/odyssee/fed+ 5.5
EXPO : TARIF SOCIAL: demandeur d'emploi/handicap/CPAS/groupe scolaire 4.5
EXPO : TARIF NORMAL COMBINE MUSEUM + GALERIE 7.5
EXPO : TARIF REDUIT COMBINE MUSEUM + GALERIE Etudiant/Senior/Enseignant/Groupe/JAP/-26ans/botacarte/odyssee/fed+ 6.5
EXPO : TARIF SOCIAL COMBINE MUSEUM + GALERIE : demandeur d'emploi/handicap/CPAS/groupe scolaire 5.5
EXPO : BILLETS D'ENTREES COMBINE MUSEUM + GALERIE : Museum Pass/Brussels Card/enfant -12 ans/NH Hôtel Bloom/Subba Memb./VIP/concours 0
EXPO : HABITANTS SAINT-JOSSE COMBINE MUSEUM + GALERIE ( le dimanche uniquement) : résidents 0
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The "SPECTRE" exhibition, featuring seven sculptors of all generations, is a theatrical production held in Le Botanique Museum.
Unusual everyday objects arise in the room as if to call us to order or, conversely, to resist.
Scales are distorted, inspirations are marginal, and referents appear out of surrealist analepses.

When

16 June 2022 to 07 August 2022

Where

  • Museum

Doors

12:00 > 18:00

Organiser

Botanique
spectre
© Charlotte Lavandier 

Scales are distorted, inspirations are marginal, and referents appear out of surrealist analepses.

The materials used evoke an abrupt reality. Concrete, brick, resin, wood, and plaster join forces to firmly root the audience in a tangible world.

But their presence and influence force us to confront our reference points through a fantastic aura and disturbing realism.

SPECTRE invites us to rethink our collective memory and reconsider the territories that we inhabit, to observe the architecture around us and more broadly, to reconsider the notion of “living together” and its drawbacks.

 

Jonathan De Winter (Liege, 1982 – lives and works in Liege)

Paintings, installations, performances, assemblages, and sound assaults... Jonathan De Winter’s artistic approach is a wild and explosive mix, a risk-taking process for the creator. Inhabited by a manifold energy, Jonathan De Winter’s undisciplined art is not conceived as a rigorous project, but emerges from an aesthetic of waste, chaos, and recycling, from which the construction of offbeat, conflicting and exalted spaces emerges literally. The artist uses simple materials, generally salvaged, such as wood panels, duct tape, tyres, metal sheets, pipes, and industrial parts – not only for the sake of saving money, but also because they exude raw energy, authenticity stripped from the buildings and the sounds of the street.

 

Benoit Jacquemin (Liege, 1993 – lives and works in Theux)

Benoit Jacquemin feels very concerned by the increasing dematerialization of the world and by a routine that has become more and more digitalized. On the one hand, he is driven by the urgency of being rooted in raw, mundane subject matter and, on the other hand, by the importance of inventing a new form of visual expression, be it photographic or sculptural. His process is designed as an encounter, an imbrication, a constant dialogue between these two different approaches to reality. Photography forms the starting point of all his pieces. For Benoit Jacquemin, an image can be thought of as an autonomous object or as a record, and it often evolves into a three-dimensional piece boasting obvious craftsmanship skills (glass, metal, or marquetry work).

spectre
© Lucie Lanzini - prise de vue : Luk Vander Plaetse

 

Lucie Lanzini (Belfort, 1986 – lives and works in Brussels)

Since 2009, Lucie Lanzini’s different projects have formed a quirky landscape of sculpted objects made up of fragments of decorative elements removed from their context and which thus question our perception of reality. Lucie Lanzini is particularly interested in memories and recollections. Her creative process revolves around such notions as “fragmentation/link”, “presence/absence”, “empty/full”, etc. The casting and imprints provide the artist with a playground that she exploits marvellously to disrupt our perception.

Using forms drawn from reality, Lucie Lanzini’s artworks reveal a truth that hides behind the appearance of things. She starts from crowded items, like ornamentation, and treats them in a very minimalistic manner, preserving fragments reminiscent of the original object. The usual signifier is thus circumvented, and the artist generates a gap from which a certain strangeness emerges.

 

Charlotte Lavandier (Orléans, 1995 – lives and works in Brussels)

Somewhere between directness and metaphor, Charlotte Lavandier defines her practice as an exhibit. By extricating harsh snippets of reality, she examines our relationship with our genetic, social, and political heritage, shedding light on what we don’t see, what we no longer see. She asks the audience to do the same, to question the taboos and repressions that shape the image of one’s self and its exposure to the other. In this way, she tries to uncover a suppressed voice, places, and perspectives of life that are subjected to cruelty in its broadest sense.

She reports on complexity and singularity as a means to oppose normality. Using touch, smell, and hearing (the smell of mattresses, muffled sounds, the rubbing of heads under false ceilings, etc.), she conveys a sense of the symbolic violence that lurks beyond the boundaries of the visible. At the same time, she focuses on the banal yet semantically and semiologically laden spatial elements.

Through her installations, she wants to take the spectators out of their contemplative posture. To this end, she places her pieces in a physically and/or mentally uncomfortable position that induces an imbalance conducive to questioning.

 

Alexandra Leyre Mein (Brussels, 1979 – lives and works in Brussels)

The sculptures of Alexandra Leyre Mein stem from a meeting between organic structures and pure, crystalline forms. Seemingly in a perpetual movement, the fluid mineral sculptures shape bodies and blend anthropomorphic and zoomorphic forms. The complexity of humankind, the stratification of understandings, and the contradictions inherent therein permeate her works. These can be seen as either decaying or growing – pulsating with energy or tranquil, neither feminine nor masculine, but teetering between the two.

spectre
© Lionel Pennings - Prise de vue : Luk Vander Plaetse

 

Lionel Pennings (Belgium, 1993 – lives and works in Brussels)

Lionel Pennings investigates the physical culture of history through his sculptures made of glass, marble, and metal. Having obtained a master’s degree in sculpture from the Brussels Academy of Fine Arts, he examines museum aesthetics and archaeological fiction through the use of imprints, traps, and imitation tools.

His approach combines historical knowledge, scientific sources, and material practice: the audience can directly experience the object. The production and display of artefacts resembling tools, archaeological, scientific, and museum devices are central to the artist’s work. They reflect the artist’s curiosity for man-made tools and mechanisms and are loaded with a symbolic and poetical functions. However, they preserve their original functionality to the greatest extent possible, proposing a confrontation with a specific collective imagination and raising visual challenges that visitors will try to tackle through their own knowledge. Spectators thus experience the museum tradition, its non-neutrality, and its evolution over time. (Lara Hene, 2021)

 

Amélie Scotta (Nantes, 1983 – lives and works between Paris and Brussels)

The architectures of Amélie Scotta directly examine our habitat and the ensuing urban development. Her pieces confront the monumentality of buildings and their construction details to remind us of the human mass of cities that hangs over each of its inhabitants. Working slowly and obsessively, the artist uses drawing for its simplicity and its infinite richness. The lines and geometry serve as structures for her works, as its vehicles, and also as a means to evoke concepts of displacement, progression, and repetition. Her most recent work around construction has taken her into an increasingly relevant dialogue with sculpture.

© Jean-Baptiste Friquet
Thursday
16
Jun 2022
Sunday
07
Aug 2022
EXPO : TARIF NORMAL 6.5
EXPO : TARIF REDUIT: Etudiant/Senior/Enseignant/Groupe/JAP/-26ans/botacarte/odyssee/fed+ 5.5
EXPO : TARIF SOCIAL: demandeur d'emploi/handicap/CPAS/groupe scolaire 4.5
EXPO : TARIF NORMAL COMBINE MUSEUM + GALERIE 7.5
EXPO : TARIF REDUIT COMBINE MUSEUM + GALERIE Etudiant/Senior/Enseignant/Groupe/JAP/-26ans/botacarte/odyssee/fed+ 6.5
EXPO : TARIF SOCIAL COMBINE MUSEUM + GALERIE : demandeur d'emploi/handicap/CPAS/groupe scolaire 5.5
EXPO : BILLETS D'ENTREES COMBINE MUSEUM + GALERIE : Museum Pass/Brussels Card/enfant -12 ans/NH Hôtel Bloom/Subba Memb./VIP/concours 0
EXPO : HABITANTS SAINT-JOSSE COMBINE MUSEUM + GALERIE ( le dimanche uniquement) : résidents 0
Buy tickets